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March 29, 2012

Do you like this?

So, Eastonians: What if you were able to have a kid without ever having to get married? What if—to use a professional wrestling metaphor—it was a tag-team match versus one opponent (i.e. the child) rather than an endurance cage match lasting until the first one passes out? This scenario is the one dreamed up by lead characters Julie (Writer/Director Jennifer Westfeldt) and Jason (Adam Scott – Party Down, Stepbrothers) in the March 2012 release, Friends With Kids.

Like last year’s similarly titled Friends With Benefits, “Kids” uses an unconventional relationship to bring the romantic comedy into the aughts. Co-starring Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig, Maya Ruldoph, and Chris O’Dowd (almost making it worthy of the title Bridesmaids 2), “Kids” uses a light touch to delve into the potentially heavily opinionated and ever-popular subject of child rearing.

Let’s just get this out of the way right now: This is something you will most likely rent, stream, or catch on HBO. So while the option to drive to Annapolis to see “Kids” on the big screen is still there, I’d stay local—unless of course, you’re a member of the Adam Scott fan club, which, I wouldn’t make fun of you for, due simply to the fact that the now defunct Party Down is sorely missed.

While many of the film’s jokes have a lot of bite—even anger—to them, the narrative is utterly sitcom-worthy and whimsy. With all of the characters having been blessed with seemingly endless cash supplies while working at remarkably stress free jobs, I almost came to expect a Friends-esque guitar lick or Seinfeld funky bass line to transition the scene-to-scene. It plays like an enjoyable 100-minute pilot for a post-9 PM sitcom. I’m already imagining future “episodes” featuring the antics of quirky parents and blind dates.

Friends with Kids is reminiscent of the work of Edward Burns, who just happens to have a supporting role in the film as one of Julie’s potential suitors. And would you believe his character is supposed to be from Long Island?! Yes, much like Burns’ films The Brothers McMullen, She’s The One, and especially Sidewalks of New York, Westfeldt’s “Kids” is breezy, funny, full of beautiful white people, and forgettable as soon as you step outside of the theater.

Oh, and I almost forgot to mention that Megan Fox is in it and can act…sort of.

by

March 29, 2012

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